Remote Participation: Nigeria Internet Governance Forum (NIGF) 2013

The Nigeria Internet Governance Forum (NIGF) 2013 will be held on Tuesday 18th June 2013 at the Shehu Yar’adua Centre, Abuja. If you will not be present at the event, you can join remotely with the online WebEx information provided by the Nigerian Chapter of Internet Society below:

WEBEX DETAILS
==============

Topic: Nigeria Internet Governance (NIGF) 2013 – Opening Session [Note the time and link change]
Date: Tuesday, 18. June 2013
Time: 09:00 – 10:00 AM
Meeting Number: 924 212 463
Meeting Password: NigIntGov2013

——————————————————-
To join the online meeting (Now from mobile devices!)
——————————————————-

1. Go to https://isoc.webex.com/isoc/j.php?ED=229597692&UID=0&PW=NNTQ0ZDNlZDc0&RT=MTYjMjM%3D
2. If requested, enter your name and email address.
3. If a password is required, enter the meeting password: NigIntGov2013 4. Click “Join”.

To view in other time zones or languages, please click the link:

https://isoc.webex.com/isoc/j.php?ED=229597692&UID=0&PW=NNTQ0ZDNlZDc0&ORT=MTYjMjM%3D

——————————————————-
To join the audio conference only
——————————————————-

Call-in toll number (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3208 Global call-in numbers: https://isoc.webex.com/isoc/globalcallin.php?serviceType=MC&ED=229597692&tollFree=0

Access code:924 212 463

——————————————————-
For assistance
——————————————————-

1. Go to https://isoc.webex.com/isoc/mc
2. On the left navigation bar, click “Support”.

To add this meeting to your calendar program (for example Microsoft Outlook), click this link:

https://isoc.webex.com/isoc/j.php?ED=229597692&UID=0&ICS=MI&LD=1&RD=16&ST=1&SHA2=AAAAAtCf1EPbeCrwCWkapzgFBxIcRGBL9GP/2gNb9eeMT0dy&RT=MTYjMjM%3D

2. General Sessions 12.00noon – 1.30pm

==============
WEBEX DETAILS
==============

Topic: Nigeria Internet Governance (NIGF) 2013 – General Sessions
Date: Tuesday, 18. June 2013
Time: 11:30, Europe Summer Time (Paris, GMT+02:00)
Meeting Number: 925 651 034
Meeting Password: NigIntGov2013

——————————————————-
To join the online meeting (Now from mobile devices!)
——————————————————-
1. Go to https://isoc.webex.com/isoc/j.php?ED=229480972&UID=0&PW=NZmM0MDMwN2Q2&RT=MTYjMjM%3D
2. If requested, enter your name and email address.
3. If a password is required, enter the meeting password: NigIntGov2013
4. Click “Join”.

To view in other time zones or languages, please click the link:
https://isoc.webex.com/isoc/j.php?ED=229480972&UID=0&PW=NZmM0MDMwN2Q2&ORT=MTYjMjM%3D

——————————————————-
To join the audio conference only
——————————————————-
Call-in toll number (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3208
Global call-in numbers: https://isoc.webex.com/isoc/globalcallin.php?serviceType=MC&ED=229480972&tollFree=0

Access code:925 651 034

——————————————————-
For assistance
——————————————————-
1. Go to https://isoc.webex.com/isoc/mc
2. On the left navigation bar, click “Support”.

To add this meeting to your calendar program (for example Microsoft Outlook), click this link:
https://isoc.webex.com/isoc/j.php?ED=229480972&UID=0&ICS=MI&LD=1&RD=16&ST=1&SHA2=AAAAAlS50EAojNHNsNznNNXuHTIjluJrtQ-g-aPtTCRk/aAg&RT=MTYjMjM%3D

3. Way Forward (Youth Workshop) 11:35am -3:00 pm

==============
WEBEX DETAILS
==============

Topic: Nigeria Internet Governance (NIGF) 2013: Way Forward (Youth Workshop)
Date: Tuesday, 18 June 2013
Time: 11:15 AM to 3:00 PM
Meeting Number: 925 987 794
Meeting Password: NigIntGov2013

——————————————————-
To join the online meeting (Now from mobile devices!)
——————————————————-
1. Go to https://isoc.webex.com/isoc/j.php?ED=229554857&UID=0&PW=NOTViNzA0OTcy&RT=MTgjMjA%3D
2. If requested, enter your name and email address.
3. If a password is required, enter the meeting password: NigIntGov2013
4. Click “Join”.

To view in other time zones or languages, please click the link:
https://isoc.webex.com/isoc/j.php?ED=229554857&UID=0&PW=NOTViNzA0OTcy&ORT=MTgjMjA%3D

——————————————————-
To join the audio conference only
——————————————————-
Call-in toll number (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3208
Global call-in numbers: https://isoc.webex.com/isoc/globalcallin.php?serviceType=MC&ED=229554857&tollFree=0

Access code:925 987 794

——————————————————-
For assistance
——————————————————-
1. Go to https://isoc.webex.com/isoc/mc
2. On the left navigation bar, click “Support”.

To add this meeting to your calendar program (for example Microsoft Outlook), click this link:
https://isoc.webex.com/isoc/j.php?ED=229554857&UID=0&ICS=MI&LD=1&RD=18&ST=1&SHA2=AAAAAtzKoiQrelw3ZyNXQzWuYLJFY16gnMLFKzFrYkQcOn/a&RT=MTgjMjA%3D

CSOs: Government Should Respect Internet Freedom and the Privacy of Citizens Online

Government Should Respect Internet Freedom and the Privacy of Citizens Online

By Civil Society Organizations Working on ICT for Development Issues in Nigeria

The Nigerian media space has recently been awash with news of a multi-million dollar Internet surveillance contract, ostensibly intended to enable the government monitor internet communications of citizens. According to the Nigerian online newspaper, Premium Times, the Nigerian Government had signed a $40 million contract with an Israel-based company, Elbit Systems, to monitor internet communication in Nigeria.

Another report, titled “Stop, Jonathan, Stop – Before Nigerians Lose Their Internet Freedom“, reveals that, “…it was reported that Nigeria set aside $61.9 million for ‘Wise Intelligence Network Harvest Analyzer System’, Open Source Internet Monitoring System, Personal Internet Surveillance System And Purchase Of Encrypted Communication Equipment.”

It further explains that although “…the act of surveillance, for the purpose of ensuring national security, might appear noble, it is important to explain how lazy governance is at play again, in what could take Nigeria many years back into the military era when surveillance became a tool of oppression by the State.”

So far, the government has not denied the story of the contract award. Instead, its silence on the matter would appear to be a confirmation of the contract deal, which raises a number of serious concerns, including the following:

1. Such Internet surveillance is a rude, undemocratic and illegal violation of the privacy of citizens. The government must protect the privacy of all citizens and this should not be violated through such unwarranted surveillance of all technology-mediated communication; such as communication with friends and loved ones by email, SMS and chat;

2. It is huge waste of public resources with absolutely no return on the investment because as an open platform, the Internet has a reasonable amount of safeguards against criminal uses. In addition, the current legal instruments – if effectively employed – provide for adequate non-intrusive surveillance of suspected criminals;

3. It is a monumental waste of efforts in addressing security challenges because criminals who use the Internet for criminal purposes usually deploy sophisticated encryption technologies for which the surveillance of mail reading and interception of other communications would disproportionately affect the average and less technically-sophisticated citizen;

4. The contract is a total negation of the local content principle that the government through the National Information Technology Development Agency (NITDA) has been promoting and which is necessary for the repositioning of the national economy to achieve the goals of Vision 20:2020;

5. If government is interested in fighting cyber crime, it would focus its attention on legislating specific and better targeted cybercrime related laws that have been waiting for government action at various stages.

We acknowledge the importance of the Internet as a platform for governance, education, commerce, and indeed for all social engagements. We also acknowledge the fact that Nigeria is currently passing through a major security challenge. However, this challenge cannot be addressed by unwarranted intrusion on the privacy of citizens which only promises to lead to the abrupt collapse of the digital economy in the country and the wiping out of the benefits gained from the internet.

The measure itself is a flagrant violation of the constitutional guarantee of the privacy of citizens as provided for in Section 37 of the 1999 Constitution, which stipulates in very clear terms that “The privacy of citizens, their homes, correspondence, telephone conversations and telegraphic communications is hereby guaranteed and protected.”

The only permissible circumstances under which this right may be restricted are those stated in Section 45(1) of the Constitution, which means that the measure taken must be in accordance with a “law that is reasonably justifiable in a democratic society” to protect the stated interests or the rights and freedoms of other persons. We fail that see any such law being relied upon in the award of the illegal surveillance contract.

In view of these, we the undersigned, as representatives of our respective organizations that are committed to the use of ICTs for development:

1. Unequivocally condemn the contract and call on government to immediately cancel it;

2. Demand that the Federal Government works with the National Assembly to take legislative action on various draft laws and regulations as well as pending bill relevant to the issue and that the process should be fully transparent with adequate opportunity given to all interested parties and stakeholders to make inputs into the process.

3. Enjoin the government to work with all stakeholders to curb cyber crime and address security problems, arising from the use of the Internet, within the context of democratic norms and principles and in accordance with international best practices of protecting the privacy and human rights of citizens.

Signed by: BudgIT, Centre for Information Technology Awareness and Development (CITAD), Co-Creation Hub (CcHub), Development Information Network (DevNet), Enough is Enough (EiE) Nigeria, Fantsuam Foundation (FF), Media Rights Agenda (MRA), Paradigm Initiative Nigeria (PIN), Wennovation Hub, West African NGO Network (WANGONeT) and Women’s Technology Empowerment Centre (W.TEC)

[Draft Statement on Internet Freedom/Communication Privacy in Nigeria by ICT4D CSOs]

[Tweets] On Internet Surveillance Contract for Nigeria

Nigeria: Pardon for GEJ’s former oga at the top…

Dr. Goodluck Jonathan, GCFR, granted Presidential Pardon to his former Oga At The Top, and one of his aides was quick to shift the blame to the Council of State. Well, here’s what the constitution says. And more…

2013 Cyber Dialogue Conference. And Blogs You Should Read!

The Cyber Dialogue conference, presented by the Canada Centre for Global Security Studies at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto, convenes an influential mix of global leaders from government, civil society, academia and private enterprise to participate in a series of facilitated public plenary conversations and working groups around cyberspace security and governance.

Governance without Government in Cyberspace?

As cyberspace continues its rapid growth, embedding itself deeper into everything around us and helping to shape our identities, the models, norms, rules, and principles which have until now governed the US-anchored Internet are coming under stress. As cyber demographics shift to the global South and East, alternative models are being developed outside of the Internet’s old North Atlantic core. New rules and norms are spreading as practices grow and diversify. How to govern cyberspace in our intensely globalized world has become an acute public policy issue, for us all.

In the third annual Cyber Dialogue, participants will address questions around the theme of “Governance without Government in Cyberspace?” Phrased deliberately as an open question, we shall interrogate what are the proper roles and limits for public and private authority in cyberspace across a range of fundamental issues. What power can states, private companies, and civil society exercise in this domain? What is the appropriate balance of power among the increasingly diverse set of cyber stakeholders, from the local to the global? Who, and whose values, will set the stage for the future of cyberspace governance? What are the checks and balances?

Blog Posts (from leading experts)

Facing the costs of an open Internet – by Karl Kathuria

Democratic state surveillance, transparency and trust – by Andrew Clement

Against Hypocrisy: Updating Export Controls for the Digital Age – by Danielle Kehl and Tim Maurer

Watching the Watchers: A Role for the ITU in the Internet Age – by Jonathon W. Penney

WCIT-12: The Shadow at Evening rising – by Alexander Klimburg

Hacking back, signaling, and state-society relations – by Adam Segal

Arms Trade as Analogy – by James Lewis

Global Governance and Cyberspace: Fortresses or Oases? – by Paul Meyer

A Scene from the Road to Cyber Governance: The Budapest Cyberspace Conference – by Roger Hurwitz

Culled from the 2013 Cyber Dialogue Conference website.

Mapping tweets in Johannesburg, Lagos, Nairobi, Tunis, Accra, Addis Ababa, Mogadishu and Kigali

In Mapping Tweets in Africa, Simon Rogers wrote:

Who uses Twitter in Africa – and where are they based? Mark Graham and the team at the Oxford Internet Institute have looked at Tweets from key African cities – and the variation tells you a lot about access to technology across the continent. Just look at the variation between Johannesburg and Mogadishu. The data is not normalised for population but it still provides a unique insight.

I’ve used screenshots of the maps created by Mark Graham and Floating Sheep to re-create a single image, below, that allows you see the difference between the cities. The maps represent Johannesburg (row 1 left), Lagos (row 1 right), Nairobi (row 2 left), Tunis (row 2 right), Accra (row 3 left), Addis Ababa (row 3 right), Mogadishu (row 4 left) and Kigali (row 4 right).

Mapping tweets in 8 African countries

Seeking a More Free Internet through Multi-­Stakeholder Dialogue

Joint Statement of Civil Society Delegates to the 2012 Internet Governance Forum

We, the undersigned representatives of civil society who attended and participated in the 2012 Internet Governance Forum (IGF) on 6-9 November 2012 in Baku, Azerbaijan, make this statement upon the conclusion of the meeting to highlight the opinions we expressed and concerns we raised throughout the Forum. We engaged in this meeting with the objective of advocating for internet freedoms, including the rights to freedom of expression and opinion, and the rights to seek, receive, and impart information, as protected by Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Our participation at the IGF was enabled by the unique multi-stakeholder model of the IGF, which gives civil society an equal voice alongside the government, business, and the technical communities. We believe this model creates more robust dialogue and more meaningful debate on the many issues involved in internet governance, including internet freedom, and we strongly support the continuation of the IGF and reject any proposals that would exclude civil society from its currently active role in determining the future of the internet.

In recent months and years, documents such as Freedom on the Net, published by Freedom House, and the 2011 report on internet freedom published by Frank LaRue, United Nations Human Rights Council Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Opinion and Expression, have documented growing threats to internet freedom around the world.  In 2012, UN Human Rights Council Resolution L13 affirmed that all human rights should apply online just as they apply offline, and other internet freedoms were asserted in the 2011 Joint Declaration on Freedom of Expression and the Internet, signed by representatives of the Organization for American States (OAS), the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights (ACHPR), the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), and the United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC).

We also note that next month, in Dubai, the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) will hold a major meeting that could fundamentally alter the structure and global reach of the internet. At the World Conference on International Telecommunications (WCIT), which is open only to member states, their delegations, and some corporations able to pay for access, governments have put forward proposals that could expand the authority of the ITU over the internet in ways that would threaten internet openness and innovation, increase the costs of access and connection, and erode human rights.

Motivated by these concerns, we make the following recommendations to the Internet Governance Forum and the stakeholders represented in Baku this year:

To Governments

  • We call upon all governments to work toward universal access to the internet, regardless of barriers related to ethnicity, religion, race, gender, disability, sexual orientation or language.
  • We call upon governments not to block websites in any but the most limited and exceptional cases, and only when provided by a just law, pursuant to the purposes laid out in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and implemented according to due process by an independent judicial body in the least restrictive way required to achieve the purported aim. Further, we call upon governments to respect the right of their citizens to appeal in a just court of law the blocking or censorship of websites.
  • We implore governments never hold intermediaries liable for content they host or transmit.
  • We urge governments not to systematically collect private data on citizens, and to ensure that any surveillance conducted to pursue criminal elements should be limited, exceptional, and subject to the approval of an independent judiciary.
  • We call upon all states to investigate and work to prevent physical and online attacks against citizens who express their opinions online, and to hold the responsible parties to account.
  • We urge all states to ensure that individuals can speak anonymously on the internet.
  • We implore all governments to control the export of technologies that could be used to monitor or surveil, and to restrict the export of those technologies to regimes that have failed to demonstrate a commitment to upholding human rights.
  • We strongly urge all governments to cease campaigns designed to deliberately misinform citizens or discredit and dilute independent voices.
  • We encourage all governments to include civil society in their delegations to the World Conference on International Telecommunications (WCIT) in December, 2012.

To Internet Companies

  • We urge ICT companies to join the Global Network Initiative, and abide by its code of conduct.
  • We call upon internet intermediaries not to limit rights to free expression and access to information except after legitimate judicial intervention, and to publicize all government requests to remove content or block services.   We urge all ICT companies with access to the personal information of users to fully respect the privacy of those individuals, retaining as little of that information as possible and preventing the exposure of that data to third parties.

To International & Multilateral Bodies

  • We call upon international and multi-lateral institutions to adopt internet freedom as a core value, and to speak out publicly against violations of human rights online.

To the International Telecommunications Union & Member States

  • We call upon all those represented at WCIT in December, 2012 to reject any proposals that might expand ITU authority in ways that would threaten the continued growth and global nature of the internet or restrict the exercise of human rights online.

Signatories:

  • Freedom House
  • ‘Gbenga Sesan, Paradigm Initiative Nigeria
  • Thai Netizen Network
  • Kamal Sedra, DISC Development
  • Mahmood Enayat, Small Media
  • Asociacion por los Derechos Civiles, Argentina
  • Digital Rights Foundation, Pakistan
  • Alaksiej Carniajeu, Belarus IT Aid
  • Siarhei Mackievic, Assembly of Pro-Democratic NGOs of Belarus
  • Anas Helali, Syrian IT specialist
  • Arzu Geybullayeva, Azerbaijani blogger
  • Myanmar ICT for Development Organization
  • i freedom Uganda
  • Community Empowerment for Progress Organization – CEPO, South Sudan
  • Egyptian Democratic Academy
  • Common Europe Foundation
  • Dr. Katy Pearce, Assistant Professor of Communication, University of Washington

 

You can download a copy of the joint statement. Source: Freedom House

 

A Time to Map: Mapping the Nigerian Tech Ecosystem

Image courtesy Co-Creation Hub, Lagos

There is a time for everything. There’s a time to learn, and a time to apply that which has been learnt. There’s a time to apply what’s been learnt, and a time to show results. There’s a time to show off results, and a time to connect results and resources with others. There’s a time to connect, and a time to raise a new generation of doers. And then, there’s a time to ask who exactly is doing what, where and when. For the Nigerian tech ecosystem, that time – the time to map the industry – is now.

For a while now, I’ve had two kinds of conversations with various people around the not-so-defined buzz within Nigeria’s tech ecosystem. From eCommerce to policy, start-ups to hubs and events to some more talk, Nigeria is seeing a revolution similar to what happened in the ’70s when a generation of tech people returned home from new knowledge acquired on a topic that was still magic at home. Today, that generation sits atop industry associations that many accuse of being disconnected from the real work of innovation going on in the Nigerian tech space.

My conversation has been with two broad categories: those who want to make a sense of what’s up with Nigerian tech so they can benefit from the revolution, and those who are within the thick of things and just want to know how what they’re doing impacts the bigger picture. The advantage of this is that one gets better perspective of the ecosystem, but it also comes with the disadvantage of spending valuable time explaining what can actually be made available as a resource for future reference and relevant consultation. That explains my excitement when CcHub’s Bosun Tijani and I discussed the need to map Nigeria’s tech ecosystem few weeks ago.

In the early days of tech in Nigeria, it was easy to know what folks were doing because everyone sort of met at one watering hole or the other – meetings, contract bids, etc. But then, the industry has grown with Nigeria and we now have so much going on such that it’s impossible for us to have as many touch points as are required for anyone to make sense of chaos. Some of the demerits of this scenario include the replication of exact same projects with strained resources; disconnect between government, academia and industry; complex process of engaging ideas within the ecosystem from outside; and more.

Mapping the ecosystem is like bringing order to somewhat organised chaos. It will help us see who is doing what, where, when, and more. It will also allow actors – or intending players – know who to engage and exactly what space everyone plays in. Just as a map allows us see where each utility exists to serve the community, a mapping exercise for the Nigerian tech ecosystem will allow us see who is working on policy, capacity building, research, incubation, funding, bottom-of-pyramid engagement, mobile, getting-hands-dirty and all that needs to be done, or is being done.

It then makes it easy for new entrants to know who their existing competitors are, where they fit within the food chain and/or who they can hook up with as partners. As an investor, you can easily see where your money will have most impact instead of playing “tente” based on who you know and think may know what you’re looking for. It also becomes easier for government to see policy gaps, for the academia to see where research is most needed and also for the media to see better connections between seemingly isolated activities.

So, it’s the time to map. And this is an early invitation to engage the process when PIN and CcHub call for a stakeholder session in Q1 2013.

12 Reasons To Attend #TENT2012 From 10-12.12.12

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Reply